Whistling A Hurricane.

Whistling In A Hurricane.

IDIOCY IS CRIMINAL, LOOKING SOMEWHERE ELSE, EVIL.

****

[18 hours after the essay below was posted, to my very pleased astonishment, the UN Security Council passed a resolution authorizing “all necessary means” in Libya to protect civilians. The vote was 10 for, 5 abstaining. I want to congratulate the farsightedness of India, China and Russia, which overcame their concern about democracy intervening inside devious, democratically challenged countries. There is hope for them.

By contrast, Germany’s attitude was lamentable, anti-democratic, cowardly, symptomatic of a country that does not understand that democracy is worth fighting for, ahistorical, and anti-European. Merkel, who used to be a privileged youth of the fascist East German regime, seems to have returned to her questionable roots.

According to Le Figaro, BHL, Bernard Henri Levy, who climbed very late on the revolutionary train pushed Sarkozy, and then the West to war. Sarko worked on the 15 governments of the UNSC one by one, but the UN Resolution passage was acquired at last minute…. An encouraging case of philosophy in the driver seat.]

****

****

Our civilization is an immensely complicated machine which thinks and feels. And it is getting more complex by the day. We cannot do without it. Without it, we, and all we love, will be dead, or dying. As the leaders exhibit this or that emotion, they drive events. Out of vile emotions, evil events. E-vil, indeed.

This civilizational machine has something in common with the doomed nuclear reactor complex at Fukushima, which could very well entirely melt, explode, burn, and not just force the evacuation of the world’s largest city. That would happen, in the worst possible case. But at this point, the reasonable thing to do is to proceed logically backwards from the worst possible case. So it is in Libya.

Proceeding from the worst often is the most reasonable, and should ever be more so, as we learn to see further, as we need to, as the machine gets ever more complex, and we need to steer the probability waves, just so.

So let’s suppose the worst has happened at Fukushima, with its 6 reactors, and 6 pools of nuclear combustible:

1) What would that worst be? Well, in the worst imaginable case, the pools where barely used nuclear rods are stored, would have dried up, and heated up so much that they caught fire. That’s the worst. The consequence would be "apocalyptic" (as the chief radioactivist in Europe put it in a diplomatic style reminiscent of yours truly).

2) So how do we prevent this worst possible case? Well France flew one hundred tons of boric acid (the element boron, B, stops neutrons, hence nuclear reactions), 10,000 anti-radiation suits, and various other equipment. South Korea will send some of its Boron reserve too. And a USA warship has provided high power water cannons. Anything whatsoever ought to be done to bring water to the pools.

If there is water, there is hope. No water, no hope. And the fall-out could be worldwide.

The crisis in Japan illustrates the necessity for catastrophic calculus. Catastrophic calculus would be employed after usual risk analysis.

For example the Fukushima reactors and pools had three systems for providing electric power to the water circulation system. This is typical of reactors, and other sensitive sites worldwide; pile up the safety systems locally. But if one piles them up all in the same place, they can fail all together.

Nuclear reactor complexes should have off site emergency cooling and anti-reactive systems, with their own autonomous, sustainable power (no pun intended).

The crisis in Japan happened because of idiotic geological analyses, idiotic engineering, idiotic risk analysis, and the amazingly idiotic storage, next to the reactors, of gigantic quantities of nuclear fuel. Yes idiotic is the word, there is no other that fits the perfectly idiotic strategies deployed, with delirious obstinacy over decades.

The attitude relative to Libya, a green light to its Pluto, Gaddafi, is even more idiotic, because it is giving a green light to the most brutish force. Today Libya, tomorrow, the world.

If you think the nuclear crazies in Pakistan and North Korea did not notice that the Libyan dictator and criminal against mankind could not be eliminated, when he could easily have been, I have soon to show you hundreds of nukes heading your way.

Ultimately the democracies will find themselves at war, for real, against immense forces with none of Gadhafi’s comic allure. And hundreds of millions will die, and fingers will be pointed out to today’s democratic leaders, desiccated dwarves apparently deprived of brains, guts,  hearts, and any respect or affection for their children, who will have to fight the war they brought. With their inaction.

Obama went to "fill up his brackets", in public on the sport channel, ESPN, something the rest of the world does not know what it is. In a literally critical situation, he produced himself as a well trained dog of the national mindlessness. Is that all he is?

"Filling the brackets" has to do with projecting team sports results for the rest of the year. You will not see the leaders of major democracies indulging in such circus, when the situation is as critical as it is now.

But this is the USA. The Americans got bread, they have to be given circus, and the joker in chief provides it on the sport channel. No doubt ESPN will know how to reward him someday. Thus the dog comes to the table. By the way, in Europe representing a brand on TV, or even alluding to it is against basic ethics. But, apparently the US president is the under assistant east coast promotion man.

A Roman philosopher and poet, Juvenal, was the first to observe that the backbone of plutocracy was for the emperor to provide " panem et circenses" (100 CE). Some emperors, namely Nero, Caligula, Commodus, entered the arena in person, and made a show of themselves. Obama is the last representative of a long tradition.

Americans are big on this sort of thing, obsessing about sports, so they can be small on the rest. Takes two to tango to Armageddon, People and plutocracy, a co-dependency of victim and torturer.

Instead Obama should have asked his underlings how come the armada the USA has deployed in Japan cannot bring water to the burning nuclear fuels. After all, the army of the USA is the army of Japan (Japan has only a self defense force, which is quite small, 40% of which is mobilized by the quake/tsunami).

But not only that: in the worst possible case, the safety of the USA is engaged (and not just by the evacuation of Tokyo). Obama is commander in chief of the USA, but, also, de facto, commander in chief of Japan. What does he do on this critical day? He "fills up his brackets". Ah, but his unworthy predecessor, emperor Justinian, before he destroyed millions in the name of Jesus, and his triple head, never missed a game. Morons had it easy in history, so far.

Our civilization feels, and thinks out of its feelings. It was one of Bush’s big themes: feel the wrath of democracy, and it will spread. That much was correct. But, of course, Bush was dissembling: he was mostly pursuing aims antagonistic to democracy and civilization. Still is. A general confusion reigns ever since.

It is true that democracy needs wrath to defend it. It is no coincidence that Republican Rome, Britain and France have been among the world’s most aggressive societies. (Interestingly, when Rome became a fascist empire, its wrath on exterior enemies mostly disappeared, proving that the Roman expansion had been propelled, indeed, by the wrath of democracy!)

Don’t expect Germany and Russia to understand that too well: they found themselves at the end of the Franco-British gun all too many times, and they are perhaps a bit too fresh at democracy themselves. Merkel certainly does not seem to have understood well that Germany’s banks and industries profited of the profligacy of the PIGS (Portugal Ireland Greece Spain). And that now Germany has to contribute, having well profited. Russia of course understand that it is its right to torture the Caucasus, just as Gaddafi has the right to torture Libya, Benghazi and the Cyrenaica…

By decisively deciding to be indecisive with Gaddafi, Obama gave a green light to all bloody dictators. Qadhafi has no legitimacy whatsoever; he made a coup, and never conducted even one fake election, and sometimes all his streets killers are paid mercenaries from other African countries (they wear yellow helmets). But, OK, his torturers are first class, and he does whatever it takes to subdue his people, and to provide oil to the West. All notions well appreciated in Washington, DC. Moreover, Kadhafi is a first class plutocrat, adulated by his peers, the world’s financiers of the kleptocratic type.

So Obama winked to Kadhafi, while waging his finger, the sort of ballet of gestures the charming Dr. Saif al Islam al Gadhafi is prone to do, smiling, on TV, as the great showman that he is.

Asked pointed question about the weasel behavior of his administration, Obama’s spokesman blurted out incoherently that they had to consult with "international partners".

I knew the concept of ‘friends", or "allies". But "partners"? Who are these "partners"? Russia, China, India, Libya? Having long been a "partner" to Japan, GE, General Electric, having sold cheap melting, exploding reactors to the land of the rising sun, at Fukushima, among other places, is now "partner" to China… Selling American secrets. And rules behaviors… China now tells us to stay out of Libya? Why don’t we tell China to stay out of Tibet? (Check the distances and the history, on both sides.) And what is exactly India doing in Kashmir? A bit the same as Qaddafi and Russia do with their contradictors?

By giving a green light to Gadhafi, Obama gave a green light for Saudi Arabia to invade Bahrain, and crush the budding democracy there. Which is exactly what Saudi Arabia did. A blood bath ensued.

If Qadhafi, and his family of bloody world class gangsters win, it is not just the Arab spring which dies.  It is not just the awe and respect for democracy which die.

In truth the armed democracies have to lead. If they do not, fascists do, fascists did, and fascists will. Lead.

When democrats become meek and uncertain about morality, as Obama has, fascists start to believe they can get away with anything. That is what happened in 1936, when, in a comparable war, part of the Spanish army attacked the Spanish people.

Democracy did not fight back in 1936. Hitler, Mussolini, fascist Japanese generals, and other fascists, worldwide, got very encouraged.

France and Britain wanted to get rid of Gaddafi. His dangerous presence will have to be extirpated someday, one way, or another, because he is a deadly danger to the neighborhood.

The USA ought to remember that France and Britain are not just allies and fellow democracies. They are who the USA mostly come from. Without France’s massive armed intervention in the fight of the American people against the English king, the USA would not exist.

Does Obama know any of this? He sure acts as if he did not. If he did, Britain, France and the USA would have cratered the Libyan’s dictator’s runways long ago (it’s super easy to do). Democracy does not ask authorization from infamy to proceed decently.

***

Patrice Ayme

***

Note on President as promotion man: One of Confucius’ most famous ideas was:”The gentleman is not an utensil.” By appearing on ESPN, right of a large, capital letters, bright red ESPN logo, intermingled with the Presidential Seal, Obama, showed clearly what his office was all about. In ancient China, the gentleman was not an utensil, in the modern USA, the emperor himself is a utensil. 

In 1965, when Obama was 4 years old, the Rolling Stones made the excellent song: “The West Coast Under Assistant Promotion Man”.

***

Note on the fascist mass homicidal dictatorship in Libya: When Al Qaeda attacked the USA, it was based in Afghanistan. Afghanistan was attacked officially to remove Al Qaeda from there, after an ultimatum to the Taliban to do just that. Then Al Qaeda went to Pakistan. Did the West then attack Pakistan? No. Why? Because Pakistan has nuclear weapons, and a lot of them. The Gadhafi gang is smart enough to understand that. So it will acquire the weapons.

China has looked the other way, according to leaked US state department, when North Korean weapons transited through China. China plays tough, and is determined to use Africa as a commodity backyard (although it is already well endowed with Tibet and Xinjiang, among other vast regions).

***

On storing seven times more nuclear fuel next to nuclear reactors than there are in the reactors themselves: “the vast majority of the fuel assemblies at the troubled reactors are in the storage pools, not the reactors”). (I will write follow up essays on the nuclear and geological idiocies at play, because they will no doubt play an even greater role, looking forward; it will be made clear that it is far from being just a Japanese problem; actually the low cost reactors were made by GE, and the geological absurdity was, and is, global).

Tags: ,

40 Responses to “Whistling A Hurricane.”

  1. keith Says:

    I take no position on any sort of ‘cratering’ with respect to Libya and those issues, if you don’t mind.

    But as for the N reactors, any Roman engineer worth his salt would have known to design them allowing for very drastic intentional cratering of them far into the earth to allow for these contingencies.

    Those ancient men who designed and implemented all sorts of ingenious things in real-time (as anyone who has even read only Caesar’s admittedly propaganda “Gallic Wars” would hopefully discern), unlike our moderns who work with whatever is at hand and constructed many miles away — would you not wager that if they were transported magically into the present they would have acquitted themselves far more admirably given a 30 minute update on modern technologies?

    By God, there were aqueducts built well over a thousand years ago which were still servicing quite admirably certain Spanish towns in the early 20th century.

    Regards,

    Keith

    Like

    • Patrice Ayme Says:

      Dear Keith: I don’t mind you abstaining about Gaddafi. I know how irresistible love can be. Saif Al islam Qaddafi paid 1.5 million at the LSE to get his PhD, and more money to the monkeys at Harvard who wrote it. Love is best green.

      The Franco-British resolution just passed, 5 abstentions, ten for it. Let’s bomb! Fast. At this point they have to attack tank columns. Fast.

      I have two essays up line on Fukushima and tsunamis. Powers that be, since they think they can order god around (“God Bless America!), have decreted that earthquakes in Japan or USA (or Europe for that matter) cannot be more than Richter 7. Max tsunami height at Fukushima had been decreted to be 5 meters, and it seems to be the same at California’s Diablo Canyon, just looking at pictures…
      Regards too, and i look forward happy bombing. Gates (of hell) is probably going to drag his feet…
      PA

      Like

  2. multumnonmulta Says:

    Large-scale social makeover is apace. For the plutocrats, we might have become too many, especially when smarten-up to their games.

    Taleb, among others, b got it right: If something it’s too complex and so much depends on it, then IT should not be allowed to exist!

    Cher Patrice, we are told that the radioactive cloud may reach our west coast as of tomorrow. What do you intend to do? How about the people around you?

    http://multumnonmulta.blogspot.com/2011/03/whats-your-energy-policy-save-start-by.html
    I guess, there are some infrastructure pieces that sit better with the government, wouldn’t that be clear by now?

    Like

    • Patrice Ayme Says:

      Multumnonmulta: I was intrigued by the French gov sending iodine to Saint Pierre et Miquelon, east of Maine…. On the other hand they also sent them to the southern pacific, they said, which means they have become overzealous. But I will not complain as they sent ten tons of boric acid to Japan…
      Well, we have no reverse on civilization. And there is no substitute, and cannibalism is just a palliative…
      PA

      Like

    • Patrice Ayme Says:

      M: Me, West Coast? I am officially not commenting on my presence on any West Coast. However, I am calm, as long as the pools don’t undergo a zirconium fire… All reactors can meltdown, that’s no problem… But the pools… They have radiation detectors, on said West Coast, BTW… The West Coast of the USA is getting a fast, direct westerly flux at this point. It’s ground grazing stuff anyway, not stratospheric such as Chernobyl, which dispersed giant quantities of radioactive materials, far away.

      Staying indoors and not munching on too much grass, or eating too many vegetarians and vegans should do it. The goddess of wisdom shall be protected… And she can fly away, if worse comes to worse…
      PA

      Like

      • multumnonmulta Says:

        I had thought you commented in a recent exchange something to the effect of West Africa 😉

        However, now that you bring the US West Coast in discussion, we should think twice of how well protected the two nuclear facilities in California are.

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          Dear Multumnonmulta: Are you insinuating that I have a creative imagination, instead of being the Obama like robot I aspire to be? Hmmm…. Come to think of it, he is a practitioneer of that ancient art, the creative autobiography…

          My father was born in Algeria, and I was nearly born there, and went there as a newborn. The next few years were spent mostly in the Sahara (my first memories amazing rocks among the palm trees, friendly giant yellow scorpions), with a bit of Senegal, and Ivory Coast (nasty waves and snakes there I remember). Then more than a decade of Senegal. I breezed through Morocco and Mauritania (although the montainous deser there was unforgettable). I am definitely an African, with an African attitude.

          The Californian nuke plants, submitted to the same quake, would explode. Moreover the Americans have the same stupid criminal habit as the Japanese to store barely used fuel on the site (Canada or China do not do that; France recycles).

          I was told the tsunami was 14 meters at Fukushima. The 1906 quake was 8.2 (although propagandists now go around suggesting it was only 7.9…) The 26 January 1700 Cascadia quake was perhaps 9.5… tsunami was above 30 meters. They made insane assumption, like there would be no tsunami. Their geology is a LIE, and I have an essay in terminal phase about it. Actually the entire west Coast of the USA could very well experience the largest earthquake ever seen. I’m not saying, Nostradamus like, that it will happen. I am saying the probability maybe 30% over the next 30 years. way too high. Same for Tokyo: those things propagate, because stress propagates.

          Anyway just a foretaste…
          PA

          Like

  3. multumnonmulta Says:

    BTW, I suggest we stop acting surprised by Obama. He’s one of them, and they have no business with Confucius. They are immoral at best.

    Like

    • Patrice Ayme Says:

      M: well, I was surprised by him flaunting himself for twenty minutes by a commercial sign. He would be fired from much European media for doing that as a journalist or guest.
      But I agree, one of them. Looks so much like it. But I am in denial for very personal reasons. So I keep on vaguely hoping and getting spanked. But OK, Obama finally consented to symbolically allow for striking the Hitler of the desert. At the last hour.
      PA

      Like

    • multumnonmulta Says:

      While I understand why the US is late with the guy in Tripoli, I think there is a reason, however unprincipled. We don’t want to be part of the official equation so that the populace doesn’t turn against our people on the field.

      What puzzles me is why Germany opposes a move. Is it because Monsieur Sarkozy got most riches out of Libya, or the Germans see indeed the danger of an open ended mandate that would pull them down with another Afghanistan like involvement?

      I understand that you personal involvement with Obama is more than the usual, however high the latter used to be to get him elected. But why don’t we just say that the institution of the US presidency has turned highly symbolical?

      Like

      • Jo Says:

        What puzzles me is why Germany opposes a move.

        No oil companies in Germany.
        Bad experience made in Afghanistan. (how long will it take, how much will it cost, will it work, will it escalate)
        Comparatively good business relationship with current regime. Not sure about who rebels are (do they represent tribes or the whole libyan nation) and what rebels want (democracy or rule of another tribe).
        Suspicious of British/US/French motives (getting oil vs helping to liberate a people, read: having to pay for the military action but not getting the spoils).
        Important regional election coming up next week. (German public is against a participation in an intervention)

        These are the themes that you can find in the German media and/or official statements.

        Merkel on an EU summit: “What is our plan if we create a no-fly zone and it doesn’t work? Do we send in ground troops? We have to think this through. Why should we intervene in Libya when we don’t intervene elsewhere?” (Guardian)

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          Dear Jo: I share you amazement. Merkel’s attiude is unfathomable. Is it back to 1933-1940, with a democratically challenged Germany allied to a democratically challenged Russia, and France and Britain defending democracy against all odds? I hope she loses her elections. I was not anti-Merkel until today, in spite of her not-understanding-she-owed-the-PIGS. But this does it.

          As I mentioned before, Merkel, and many of the people who influence her, do not want the EU’s weight to shift south, as it has to. Logic, geography, and Britain-France-Italy-Spain (BFIS?) have interest to shift south. The EU cannot afford to not control its south side of the Med, as it is next door, and it’s entangled with it (something De Gaulle, a cultural racist, did not understand).

          When I stand in the Cote d’Azur, looking south over the sea, I know all too well my good city of Algiers, familiar to my infanthood, is 500 miles south, and I hope to visit it someday again. I don’t have the same draw for Berlin or Warsaw. The limit of my emotive geographical world is pretty much Lake Konstanz (I stayed there for a while as a child).

          The rebels are just normal people who desperately rose against one of the bloodiest, most ferocious dictators (who just promised “cleansing” of Bengazi). So, of course, they are completely disorganized, and they had only weapons they scavenged. But Gaddafi did not trust Eastern Libya, and, more generally his army, so he had left no heavy weapons. Only his special forces are armed to the teeth…

          As far as suspicion for French-UK-US motives, they were getting already all the oil they wanted from Kadhafi. Plus immigration control. France and Britain really act out of democracy, a notion apparently still difficult to conceptualize in some German circles. Indeed, more than pathetic, astounding.
          PA

          Like

      • multumnonmulta Says:

        Patrice, there is probably a certain level of democracy-fatigue in the west, as in ‘we are tired even of pretending!”

        As for the regular folk, with all the increasing costs, people feel less generous towards subsidizing any altruistic scheme too far away rfom home.

        However, I should say, fear not, for whomever initiated the North African spectacle won’t let Colonel Kadhafi spoil the show. The thing with the myopic Germans may also have something to do with the little Gaelic rooster, aka Sarko, who was too cry about his quickly securing the good barter with the Libyans once the US lifted the sanctions. Berlusconi should also be in a funny situation… All in all, the Germans have the Russians, so they must feel no reason to secure the Franco-Italian arrangements.

        Yes, I know, you keep talking about principles, but who believes in those besides the philosopher(s)? The masks are falling, we may soon wake up to the Hobbesian world.

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          Dear Multumnonmulta: Well, I don’t think there is democratic fatigue in Britain and France. Specially France. Britain has given up on the multicultural politics, a contradiction to democracy, and that is comforting France to seize back her old tough line on republic and democracy (as demonstrated by the anti-veil law).
          Libya is not far from Franco-Britania, much closer than Atlanta to Mexico. And nowadays, the planet is our oyster, anyway.

          Much has been deplored about the diminution of the west, but it is the contrary which is true, and therein the danger. The Rest is in danger of evolving exactly like Germany in the 19C; thinking the sky is the limit, and there are no rules except the inertia of force.

          I don’t think there is a sinister conspiracy, as you do, but for young people talking to each other, and instructing themselves through new media. Africans and Mideasterners love to talk, and think. What they lacked was correct, and varied information to feed these conversations. Add a striking rise in basic commodities, and boooom…

          I know for a fact that, several years ago, my blog, or more exactly this unfolding set of essays, was debated in Iran, especially my interpretation of Muslim history (Senegal has a very different form of Islam, so I did not invent everything there). I got some direct questions about my background, and ideas, but it was taking too much time.

          Principles exist with anybody. And the first human principle is:…”by all means necessary“… Did Hobbes say something republican Rome did not take into account? Let’s not forget Rome’s. and France’s fascist symbols…. I think all too many people in Germany do not understand democracy is worth fighting for. Don’t forget that Merkel was raised in the Kasner family, who voluntarily emigrated to Stasi-Land, and was very advantaged (cars, going west anytime, etc.). At this point i do not believe anything she says. I put her on top of my sh.. list.
          PA
          PA

          Like

      • multumnonmulta Says:

        FYI:
        http://community.nytimes.com/comments/www.nytimes.com/2011/03/18/world/africa/18nations.html?permid=49#comment49

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          Multumnonmulta: Thanks for the reference. Very interesting. OK, I sort of agree.

          But not really. The author lives a bit in American dreamland. It is true that, at the last hour, headed by Clinton, after her latest Paris trip, the US administration joined the French and British. Basically it did what I had suggested all along: let Britain and France take the lead.

          A little force 2 weeks ago would have done wonder. Just cratering his runways. Instead many thousands died (one talks about 15,000, perhaps more than the tsunami). And now we have to do much more.

          I noticed that the French and especially the philosopher BHL had to go in high gear, all incandescent, and Sarko took immense risks. The commenter came out with Obama played it right, blah blah… Clearly Gates of Hell did his best to do nothing in Libya, and it’s no coincidence Clinton said she would not be foreign minister anymore.

          I had myself to wrack my brains about finding reasons to do away with Kadhafi, which were not in the media, and put them out on my blog, which maybe read somewhere else than Washington.
          PA

          Like

      • multumnonmulta Says:

        Cher Patrice, whether or not we agree with what was written, that’s how the conversation goes.

        Calling for a return to values, so far away form home, doesn’t help in practical terms, it only signals a principled position.

        But then again, this is the assumed condition of the philosopher!

        P.S. No, I don’t insinuate anything about you in relation to Obama. If I see something, I call it.

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          Dear Multumnonmulta: In 1800 CE, it took around two weeks to go from the north of France or Great Britain, to their south, by the fastest means. Now, it takes less than half a day to go from DC to Tripoli, and not even by the fastest means. A ballistic missile takes half an hour, from DC to Tripoli. It’s a small world. On a horse, at triple gallop, in half an hour, one covers less than 30 kilometers, and the horse is dead. So Tripoli, by 1800 CE standards, is 30 kilometers from the White House, and his whito-black resident in chief.

          Libya is not free to do whatever. Force will be used, one way or another. Will it be civilized force, or uncivilized force? That is the question. Democracy answers it, or is not.
          PA

          Like

  4. keith Says:

    Dear Patrice,

    In reference to the 30% prediction of greater seismic activity over the next three decades, or estimate worth considering, it might be fairer to you to say, though I haven’t the aptitude to venture into such estimations, it bears emphasizing that if global warming is real, then we have scenarios with possibly more massive transfers of weight across the floataing tectonic plates than the already established very large seasonal variations due to water and geological cycles.

    Building large dams and such is already known to have triggered earthquakes, simply by depositing and removing large quantities of earth and moving water.

    Reminds me of E. O. Wilson’s book “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge,” where he bemoans specializing fragmentation.

    Mr. Ike Skolem’s entry on Multum’s site is really one of the most interesting and moving things to be seen in awhile.

    Keith

    On M

    Like

  5. Jo Says:

    Patrice wrote: “France and Britain really act out of democracy, a notion apparently still difficult to conceptualize in some German circles.”

    Dear Patrice,

    did France (same government as today) also act out of democracy when it invited Ghaddafi to Paris for a 5 day official state visit in 2007, where it had him set up tents in a Paris mansion, cut deals with him in weapons and a nuclear reactor worth 14.7billion in 2007 dollars and let all of this happen on the World Human Rights day ?

    Partice, you are usually a sharp observer but somehow you turn a blind eye on the true motives behind the French and British actions. Do you not think that Sarkozy and the French elites have a sort of nostalgia for France’s former colonial empire which included military administration (1943-51) of the southwestern region of modern day Libya, the Fezzan. Do you not think that outside economic motivitations (Paris’ “special missions” have already made deals with rebel leaders) we are looking at new (remember Sarkozys brain fart: the Mediterrean Union) attempt of extending French influence to the south into old colonial property ?

    Answer my this question Patrice, if the Gaddafi regime tumbles down will the multitude of tribes fighting in this uprising be able to set up a strong central government ? If they are not able, who do you think will be the most powerful force in this newly liberated Libya ? Who will call the shots when the locals are in disunion and competition. Correct, the colonial masters, oh forgive me, the well meaning foreign liberators.

    This is the oldest game in history and France played it for centuries. The French elites care about democracy in Africa as much as an icecube cares for sunshine. Yes Gaddafi is a tyrant, but a tyrant with strong central power who used his “energy weapons” to his and his clans advantage often against foreigners which he played against each other (Russians, Chinese, Europeans, US). In a way Gaddafis regime is the outcome of an anticolonialist revolution, wich succeded what sovereignty and self determination is concerned, but failed horribly in all other respects (freedom, democracy, prosperity). The recent actions of the French and English neocolonialists do not aim to restore these other aspects although they of course pretend to have this at their hearts but they aim at undermining sovereignty and self determination in order to extend their influence and control over ressources.

    Patrice, wake up !

    Like

    • multumnonmulta Says:

      Jo, if I may, I’d like to ask you a question: Can the west (even in reduced Franco-X form) get a better deal on the Libyan resources by taking Gaddafi out?

      When I write the west, I’m trying to suggest that the whole matter is of common concern way beyond France’s neo-colonial aspirations. The better we match the demand for resources the less power will have the owners of the resources. What’s in it for the US, other than an ease in demand? One could only hope that those resources are traded in dollars. BTW, I’d add to the resources the millions of youth, who can supplant the Chinese if need be.

      The realist could also point how we took Saddam out, yet things are mixed at best.

      Now, do I believe myself in what I’ve written? Not at a value level, for all those calculations are too harmful for most. Yet, the practice of power has shown that these may well be the parameters of the conversation. What can I do about it? Hell, I cannot get even my little city council to do anything else than serve some stupid interests at the expense of the community.

      So, what I think will shake our societies won’t be nature as much as the lack of values. We stopped even pretending…

      Like

      • Jo Says:

        “Jo, if I may, I’d like to ask you a question: Can the west (even in reduced Franco-X form) get a better deal on the Libyan resources by taking Gaddafi out?”

        Multumnonmulta, read this to get some more background information on the situation that is unfolding:
        http://www.forbes.com/2009/01/22/libya-gaddafi-oil-biz-energy-cx_ch_0122libya.html
        http://www.aawsat.com/english/news.asp?section=1&id=20170
        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/23/wikileaks-libya-oil-company_n_827362.html

        Without strong central control and a divide and conquer strategy by the West a nationalisation of the oil industry is unthinkable. As long as Gaddafi is in power every contract made with western companies is dependend on the goodwill of a madman and relations to the oil companys country of origin. This uprising is a perfect opportunity, to remove this man, get control of the resources, create an environment where these resources can be exploited without interference and look like a hero at the same time (unlike Iran 53, or the French neocolonial and exploitational regimes in “Françafrique”; compare http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/06/21/la_vie_en?page=0,1 or http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/inside-frances-secret-war-396062.html)

        You just need to look at what the French plutocrats are doing in other parts of Africa (far away from TV cameras) to understand that this coming intervention has nothing to do with promoting democracy.

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          Dear Jo: French plutocrats in Africa? Right, so called “independence’ gave them a freer hand. But one may easily argue that the increasing Chinese presence is even more of a problem, looking forward.

          Why? Inasmuch as some French plutocrats exploit, and ought to be rolled back, the main problem is too little French presence, not too much. There are about 160 million people in Africa of French language and French culture, and they are neither of American or Chinese culture. Everybody knows the Chinese are in Africa out of exploitation (as some French plutocrats are, and even my good friend BHL partook in the process). And out of exploitation alone. But most Euro-Africans such as me are not exploiting anything, and just thriving as multicultural blossoms (putting modesty aside). It’s a multicultural phenomenon, and the force of true multiculturalists is the ability to make triage among values.

          To chant the virtue of centralized madness as panacea is an old song Hitler, Mussolini, Franco used to sing, plenty enough. And enough is enough. Democracy knows that song well: Xerxes and Darius sang it already. It’s more appropriate to do as the Athenians did (or even the Spartans: throw Kadhafi and his sons down the well!).

          Old Egypt was somewhat fascist and plutocratic, but not so much that many ideas could not blossom. However it was defeated by powers which more fascist, and the ideas suffered. it’s all about balance and degrees…
          PA
          PA

          Like

      • multumnonmulta Says:

        Jo, I asked, you replied, “Multumnonmulta, read this to get some more background information on the situation that is unfolding…”

        Nothing more to say; other than the texts you pointed out show that Gaddafi is indeed a tyrant, and I hope you get the irony.

        Like

      • Jo Says:

        @multumnonmulta

        The point of the articles was not that he is a tyrant (everyone knows that, no one doubts that, whats the point of your remark?) but that he threatened to nationalize the foreign held parts of the lybian oil industry quite recently and that he used access to oil as a poltical weapon against the west. This was in response to your question ” Can the west (even in reduced Franco-X form) get a better deal …?”. By removing G. he obviously can.

        Nothing more to say indeed.

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          Jo: I don’t understand your position either. Behind Italy, France was getting the most oil directly from Libya. Although of course, oil is a world market, so it does really matter. The regime Kadhafi leads was completely corrupt in matter of oil. The most corrupt in the world. My father negotiated with a number countries, including Libya, on oil, so I am in good place to know.

          Libya’s nationalization, or not, of oil, means nothing. In practice the Kadhafi clan had always nationalized oil for its own familial purpose. There are French flags flying in Tobruk and Benghazi: do you think these people are all excited at the idea of grabbing oil for France? When France was getting all the oil she wanted already? Moreover that would be against the laws of war, and the UN. Or do you expect the French to do in Libya like Hitler did in France, and declare that a vast swathe of the country is French territory?

          What we have in Germany, unfortunately, is an incapacity to understand that democracy is worth fighting, and even dying for. Same old same old. Long ago Molkte, yesterday Hitler, today Kadhafi. (BTW, Molkte is part of my distant family, as I mentioned in the past.) It’s always the same reasoning: it’s dangerous to oppose the Guide, so we abstain to do so, and we feel self righteous about it, because we know no higher values (which is how Kadhafi and Hitler refer to themselves).
          PA

          Like

      • multumnonmulta Says:

        Jo, I placed tyrant in italics and made reference to irony. Would you like me to draw it as well? Of course I thought there was no more to be said.

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          M: there is plenty of evidence that Kadhafi is not just a tyrant, but a criminal against mankind, that is why and several of his sons are under examination at the ICJ in La Hague. Just yesterday, the murderer threatened to take down civilian airliners (civilian boats too, which is why, officially the USA entered WWI against the fascist Second Reich in 1917).
          PA

          Like

      • multumnonmulta Says:

        Patrice, few days ago, Gaddafi’s son called on Sarkozy/France to return the Libyan money spent on Sarkozy’s electoral campaign.

        Once the US decided to sign on the British brokered peace with the Libyan, countries could start to trade with Gaddafi, regardless of the fact that he did not suddenly become any better or worse. He’s just a scheming guy, who must have learned the Molosevici/Saddam-lessons, and if he’s going to have to give up he’ll do his most to extract the price. The regular Libyans will pay the price, the Germans want to have nothing to do with a protracted involvement of land-troops, while the Americans don’t want to show a moment too soon to the party.

        Be that as it may, the Europeans should be smart and decisive–though, Gaddafi has just called a ceasefire.

        By now, I’ve come to doubt the west has gone anywhere to support democracy, and Jo provided some links to support the official narrative about democracy. Indeed, since 2001, the democracy deficit in the US has been a growth area, just like the commercial deficit; so if democracy is a concern, we must start at home.

        All this being said, and with the risk of repeating myself, TRUE CITIZENS EVERYWHERE SHOULD STILL CALL FOR DEMOCRACY!

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          M: The “Sword Of Islam” says whatever, Kadhafi El Kadahfi says whatever, it has brought him a very long way, including having a PhD, Harvard, the LSE, the Prince and Soros eating in his hand. I think one should make a chemistry experiment on him. As long as he blows up, that’s fine. (Putting him on trial in a cage for years would be better, I am sure he sings nice.)

          OK, maybe they financed Sarko. That would be excellent. I am not sure Sarko is THAT dumb, though. Kadahfi and sons, being the world’s top plutocratic clan, has huge clout in the West, of course. One of the funds frozen only yesterday was 70 billion dollars. So by killing Kadahfi , we start to kill plutocracy, by the head. The Pan Am 103 deal was probably unconstitutioanal, and it’s not the way it’s believed, at least in the USA (secret discourse was opposed to the public one).

          One has to do triage with plutocracy. Carla Bruni is immensely wealthy, DSK, very wealthy (marriage). But they are our friends. Soros, is even more wealthy, but he has funded the genuine opposition. Thus, some can find their way to the pocket of democracy. And already have (although Soros, by his own admission is very very very confused…)
          PA

          Like

      • multumnonmulta Says:

        “But they are our friends.”

        Patrice, does the above statement introduce a dose of relativism or realism? Because I’m certain it’s neither idealism, nor are they the friends of any regular Joe/Jane.

        If Sarko has any money, as a public employee for his entire life, that’s because he must have served to real plutocrats. Being called president bling only shows that people saw through his infatuation with the plutocrats. Walking on high heels only distinguishes further this character…

        Now, the French elites (I’m not sure how they overlap with their plutocrats) have been wise enough post-Chernobyl to develop the only existing robotic machinery to operate at, and deal with, a malfunctioning nuclear facility. Some of these are on their way to Japan I was told. Then, I also understand that the French are the only one to recycle the spent nuclear material, as opposed to storing it on top of the (GE) nuclear facility.

        So, while there is mighty plenty to distinguish the French elites for the better, please don’t make it sound as if their plutocrats are any better, for I have a feeling that being that kind of rich person in that country is somewhat obscene.

        Now, to return to where we started, why aren’t we fussing about Bahrain/Yemen? Because the west cares about resources and markets, not democracy per se. We may have to get closer to the reality of the term, in case any legitimacy is left, once the Chinese start making bolder claims to the world’s resources. So far, the net loosers have been the regular folk in Libya and the other countries, and the question becomes: What will the whole thing cost the US folk?

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          1) Sarko does not seem rich (although he kept his private law practice a long time in parallel). Carla is a billionairess. Everybody saw Sarko had pluto envy, and carla taught to him to cut the crap. Anyway now he can just look at her.
          2) walking on high heels: I am not going to reproach most women and all cowboys… I like high heels…
          3) The accident was 60 % human error say the Japanese gov. Amazingly the PM ordered them finally to use sea water, and he was right.
          4) we have to do triage. First let’s do Libya well. That will be enough. Bahrain, there is no excuse, it seems to me, the USA could bark. Yemen is a different story. Very complex. Plus president there is out Obamaing Obama in weasel ways (he has been in power 30 years). Meanwhile it shows that the idiots who flaunt non violence as the end all be all have understood physics not. Force is the end all, be all.
          5) One can turn plutocrats, some, around. At least until they get dizzy. Best example was Louis XVI… He gave birth to two major revolutions, and his head…

          Like

    • Patrice Ayme Says:

      Dear Jo:
      I am awake, stand reassured! And I lived myself as a child in the Sahara during times of “insurrection”. I was attacked in my life, with deadly force, more than once, but, interestingly, never by African savages, who readily recognized themselves in me. However Euro-American fascists have no liking for me. I was once bombed by that rare species, French fascists. So I am not exactly naive about the issues you evoke, but there are too many to adress in one shot.

      Speaking of that bombing, since my family was denounced to the Gestapo in 1944 (obviously by some French lovers of Hitler), it’s more of the same, I guess… And the world is complex since it is someone inside the Gestapo who warned my grandfather in a timely manner… (We suspect whom.)

      One has to use ethical triage, not confuse the baby and the bath. The argument that no one knows who these rebels are is beyond the pale. As I said they are normal people, inasmuch as one can have normal people after 41 years of Hitler.

      Sarkozy received Kadhafi ridiculously, right. But that was just because Sarko was playing a game that he, Sarko, had not started. Bush II did. Can’t beat them, join them. I have no doubt that sarko is sincere here. It’s BHL, Bernard Henri Levy who went to see sarko, and talked as needed, persuading sarko to go all out.

      I always criticized BHL, because he is a plutocrat of sort, and not that deep, but on this, this most important subject, he was perfect. It’s BHL (and me, BTW) who declared war on Kadhafi: philosophers against infamy, a traditional art.

      It’s a matter of having one’s metaprinciples well ordered. Which Germany, an even greater economic power than France, obviously does not. That Turkey wants to keep on killing Kurds in peace, and therefore is not too happy to see democracy attack, I can understand. But Germany does not have that excuse. The only explanation is that ms Krasner (aka Merkel) does not value democracy as much as materialism (that was apparently the case of Ms. Krasner’s father).
      PA

      Like

      • Jo Says:

        @Patrice
        I can’t believe that you are defending Sarkozy. Well another first , i guess.

        Patrice, the biggest and the third biggest democracies on the planet (India and Brazil) did also not vote in favor of the motion. I guess they all don’t value democracy?

        We will see how much Britain, France and the US value democracy when (after sorting out Libya) they intervene on the side of the rebels in Bahrain against Saudi-Arabian troops or in Côte d’Ivoire or in multiple other places. Of course it’s not going to happen, because in Bahrain and SA “our bastards” are in power and no one really cares about Côte d’Ivoire (no oil).
        Hypocrits the whole bunch of them.

        Eventually we will also see if the Libyan rebels are indeed democratic refomers or just tribes fighting for power and control over sources of money.

        Germany abstaining makes actually a lot of sense from their POV, because the population is against another intervention, all major political parties are against it and the constitution does not allow it in the first place (military can only be used defensively, Afghanistan is considered “collective defense”).
        Actually, looking at it stricly from a legal point of view, Germany would have had to vote “no” in order to conform with constitution.

        Btw. French public opinion is against an intervention, too (60%). Sarkozy plays a dangerous game, for if this intervention goes belly up and he loses even more popularity within the French population, then the chances are high that the French will elect an ultra-right, anti-european, xenophobic antisemite as their next president.

        A question Patrice, if this no-fly zone business does not work, are you then in favor of a full scale military intervention?

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          Dear Jo:
          1) The entire French political class is unified on making war on Kadahfi. everybody recognized Juppe”s professionalism, and sarko acted on BHL’s urging. And first so was the French PHILOSOPHICAL class unified against mass malevolence. This is something brewing in French philosophy since the 1930s, when Camus opposed the Soviets. Soon afterwards several French philosophers were arrested, tortured and killed by the Nazis. One of those heroes sartre met, and nearly peed in his pants.

          2) India is obsessed by having to use mass destruction against Kashmiris and Tamils, or its own Marxist guerilla.

          3) The case of Brazil is more mysterious. The preceding president, Lula, was very friendly to France, and the present one, his plastic surgery protege’, erstwhile Marxist guerilla, seems to be anxious to show that she is not France’s creature, and completely different from Lula.

          4) France intervened masively and unilaterally in Ivory Coast, leading to the present situation. The situation is very unclear, and, as far as France is concerned, it ought to be first a UN problem.

          5) Libya is much more about collective European defense than Afghanistan. If the USA had not followed Franco-Britannia on Libya, they could have kissed Franco-British support on Afghanistan good bye.

          6) The polls show Sarko losing the next election at this point, since he does not even make the second turn, which ought to be La Marine against DSK.

          7) I am in favor of all out war, in the sense of taking Kadhafi out, and his clan to justice, as Bush II would say. In other words, just the sort of attitude I despised about Iraq.

          8) French alleged anti-semitism is an optical illusion of the foreigner. What is happening is that the French are anti-French, and more than 50% of the French are of part, or full, Arab, Berber, Jewish descent, not to mention Syria, Lebanon and the like.
          PA

          Like

      • Jo Says:

        “French alleged anti-semitism is an optical illusion of the foreigner.”

        I was strictly refering to le Pen only (the old ugly one, haven’t heard anything of that sort from the young pretty one) not the “French” in general.

        Like

        • Patrice Ayme Says:

          Dear Jo: Sorry, misunderstood you. I am used to hear, in the USA, that allegedly anti-semitic France lost WWII as fast as she could, so as to send all semites to Auschwitz, a cover-up for the fact the USA played a very dirty role leading to, and at the begining of WWII. So I react readily.

          Le Pen’s reputation is worse than his reality. He was a paratrooper, lost one eye in combat, and was elected as the youngest representative in the national assembly, ever. Marine is a good politician. I am not familiar with her ideas, but I could imagine she would make it to the presidency.

          Some feared Le Pen, but we got Merkel. The repercussion of her anti-Europeanness, anti-democratism, and cowardice as official policy,will be deep.
          PA

          Like

  6. Jacques Richarme Says:

    Jacques Richarme

    Globalement je suis d’accord avec toi, tout au moins sur les deux dangers que tu évoques.
    Le nucléaire d’abord: le Japon, qui n’a d’autre choix énergétique que la fission de l’atome! Pas de combustibles fossiles, un territoire des 2/3 de la France, montagneux à souhait et sujet aux tremblements de terre et autres raz de marée.
    Vien ensuite la Libye et son dictateur,qui est un véritable malade mental. Je pense que l’on ne peut pas reprocher au Président Sarkozy d’avoir coagulé autour de la France une coalition internationale comportant même …la ligue arabe. On (la Gauche) lui avait tant reproché son absence de soutien à la “révolution de jasmin” tunisienne et à ces mouvements de rue toujours difficilement contrôlables maintenant il a TRES rapidement réag (comme toujours!)i et l’on ne peut pas le regretter car il en est encore temps!
    Nous verrons bien et jugerons à propos.
    A bientôt,
    Jacques

    Like

    • Patrice Ayme Says:

      Bonjour Jacques!
      Il s’avere que Tepco a essaye’, pendant plusieurs jours, de sauvegarder ses reacteurs, plutot que de les fermer tout a fait.
      Le gouvernement japonais dit que c’est 60% “erreur humaine”. Finalement c’est le premier ministre qui leur a donne’ l’order de refroidir a l’eau de mer (bien que c’etait un systeme ultime, mais standard).

      En fait Fushima prouve l’inverse de ce que maintiennent les adversaires du nucleaire: pas dangereux, si on est prudent. Mais la c’etait de la folie pure, ces reacteurs de Fukushima, avant, et apres le tsunami.

      C’est BHL qui a mene’ la dance en Libye, d’apres le Figaro. Il s’est reveille’ au dernier moment. Avant, il pouvait pas, parcequ’il avait peur pour son palace au Maroc…

      Je suis satisfait de l’evolution de la situation, qui correspond a ma propagande philosophique personelle, depuis longtemps deployee. Les US font exactement ce que j’ai suggere’.

      J’ecrit un nouvel essai “destroy Kadhafi”, ou quelquechose dans ce genre. J’en profite pour tirer sur l’Allemagne a boulets rouges incandescents. Il est certain que l’attaque francaise sur le sanglant dictateur changera l’image de la France aux USA, et dans le monde. Pour le mieux.
      Patrice

      Like

  7. mario p Says:

    creed brotherhood…

    […]Whistling A Hurricane. « Some of Patrice Ayme’s Thoughts[…]…

    Like

What do you think? Please join the debate! The simplest questions are often the deepest!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: