EMOTION PLANS LOGIC. Want No More Fakery? Tell the Truth! Hurt the Feelings of Fakers!

Emotional logic builds geometrical logic. This is a neurological fact. And yes, there are alternative facts, all over, because there are incomplete logics, logic with incomplete universes, all over. Any logic depends upon a universe of facts. Not all universes of facts are complete, far from it. It happens even in physics. Somehow, much vaunted modern physics is missing 95% of the mass-energy: it has no idea whatsoever what Dark Energy and Dark Matter could be made of: a case where major facts are still missing.

Philosophy , once it knows enough science, realizes that, although we don’t know all the details yet, clearly the topology of various substances bathing the brain, with their many dimensions, are what direct neuronal geometry… This, in particular explains why one cannot fight emotions with facts readily. That is like changing grass in the steppe with scissors.

If a child makes a mistake, one doesn’t respect the “alternative”, false computation. Instead, one says, pedagogically, that the computation is not correct. Children listen, because they respect teachers and parents (or used to…) So the emotional logic of respect, makes school possible.

Paradoxically, the problem then, maybe that one uses too much rationality to try to bend rationality, confronted to adults who have the wrong emotional logic.

When I say that “emotions plan reason”, I allude to the fact that the emotional system is actually a topological computer. Topological structures can actually be more stable than geometric structures: that Descartes guessed, and Lord Kelvin elaborated further (in an attempt to make particles out of ether vortices… something which will one day resurface… Thanks to pilot wave theory…)

Faced by a lethal religious fanatic, or a climate change denier (for example), the best method may not be to present them with facts and logics they can’t understand, or are unwilling to consider. Instead, one should probably appeal to their emotional logic.

How? One way is to call a cat a cat. Confronted to idiocy, it may be more pedagogical to say it as it is: idiotic. Instead, “Multiculturalism” (and Latour was part of it) insisted that complete idiocy and primitivism, were valuable alternate realities. Now Latour says there is just one reality. Right. However the philosophy known as “French Theory” said the opposite for 60 years….

Want no more fakery? Tell the truth! Hurt the feelings of fakers!

Patrice Ayme

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Note 0: I have addressed this subject many times before:

https://patriceayme.wordpress.com/2013/12/29/emotion-primes-reason/

https://patriceayme.wordpress.com/2014/01/06/emotions-prime-reason-ii/

https://patriceayme.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/hormones-rule-reason/

https://patriceayme.wordpress.com/2014/01/09/1914-imprinting-emotions-rule-iii/

Note 1: The preceding, that emotional machinery is the architect of the geometric logic, explains the observation of John Stuart Mill that ideas don’t work to change systems of mind readily (Discoverer of the Quantum Max Planck said the same a bit later, pointing out that physics progresses one funeral at a time, or something to this effect). Anyway here is Mill: in the Subjection of Women (1869; following an essay by a female feminist in 1851)

“The very words necessary to express the task I have undertaken, show how arduous it is. But it would be a mistake to suppose that the difficulty of the case must lie in the insufficiency or obscurity of the grounds of reason on which my conviction rests. The difficulty is that which exists in all cases in which there is a mass of feeling to be contended against. So long as an opinion is strongly rooted in the feelings, it gains rather than loses in stability by having a preponderating weight of argument against it. For if it were accepted as a result of argument, the refutation of the argument might shake the solidity of the conviction; but when it rests solely on feeling, the worse it fares in argumentative contest, the more persuaded its adherents are that their feeling must have some deeper ground, which the arguments do not reach; and while the feeling remains, it is always throwing up fresh intrenchments of argument to repair any breach made in the old. And there are so many causes tending to make the feelings connected with this subject the most intense and most deeply-rooted of all those which gather round and protect old institutions and customs, that we need not wonder to find them as yet less undermined and loosened than any of the rest by the progress of the great modern spiritual and social transition; nor suppose that the barbarisms to which men cling longest must be less barbarisms than those which they earlier shake off.”

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Note 2: The preceding short essay was a comment sent to, and published by, the New York Times regarding “Why Fighting Fake News With the Facts Might Not Be Enough” by Jennifer Szalai. I give an extensive quote below, not because she is such a genius… but because the context she provides unwittingly is telling… Latour, by the way, is from a top plutocratic wine family, wealthy for generations… So his (not really “his”, just the latest parroting) declaration that massive uncontrolled immigration to the Europe is justified, just as a tsunami is justified, because waves come and go, and come back again… is a red herring… Something to look at… while doesn’t look at how Latour and his class became wealthy, the old fashion way, inheriting it…
Jan. 9, 2019

“Alternative facts”: The term manages to be tedious, ridiculous and perilous at once — a real sign of the times. For anyone who doesn’t remember, Kellyanne Conway introduced it in early 2017… serenely chiding an exasperated Chuck Todd for being “overly dramatic” as he repeatedly tried to get her to concede that lying to the American public was bad.

Her phrasing may have been new, but Conway was taking part in what has apparently become a conservative tradition — performing a skepticism so extreme that it makes the ancient Greek skeptics look like babes in the woods. Recall a high-ranking aide in the Bush administration needling a journalist for belonging to “the reality-based community.” A respect for facts, the aide suggested, was ultimately for suckers: “We’re an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality.”

You might think this kind of postmodernism would appeal to the French anthropologist and philosopher Bruno Latour, who has spent a career studying how knowledge is socially constructed. You would be wrong. Such pretensions to reality-creating grandeur, Latour suggests, amount to little more than a vulgar, self-defeating cynicism.

In “Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime,” Latour argues that climate change is forcing all of us to confront truths that seem hard to reconcile but turn out to be two sides of the same thing: 1) reality exists, whether we like it or not; and 2) our attempts to apprehend it are contingent on our social context. Along with Cailin O’Connor and James Owen Weatherall’s “The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread,” Latour’s new book offers a way to think through the seemingly insurmountable impasse carved out by political polarization and fake news.

Latour calls for an entirely new way of understanding the world. He says he wrote “Down to Earth” with a “deliberate bluntness.” He vests a surprising hope in Europe, whose colonial past — or “crimes,” as he puts it — he depicts as inextricable from the migrations it tries to keep out. “Europe has invaded all peoples; all peoples are coming to Europe in their turn,” he writes. “Give and take. There is no way out of this.”

Latour also describes migration as the human embodiment of our “new climatic regime.” Under the old way of thinking, exploited peoples and places were ignored, silenced and stripped of agency; now migrants and the earth itself are both setting out “to recover what belongs to them.”

No doubt some readers will find this to be too much, too philosophical and too French. But maybe it takes a brilliantly mind-bending book like Latour’s to show that so much reality can’t be denied.

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4 Responses to “EMOTION PLANS LOGIC. Want No More Fakery? Tell the Truth! Hurt the Feelings of Fakers!”

  1. Gloucon X Says:

    I listen to a radio show with hosts who are open borders advocates. One of them sees Mexican migration into the US a just retaking of the land that was annexed by the US as a result of the Mexican-American War of 1848. Under this “to recover what belongs to them” logic, I felt that the host should also offer to vacate his house and turn it over to a Native American.

    Like

    • Patrice Ayme Says:

      This is a movement and ideology called “DECOLONIZATION”. It was invented in France.
      https://patriceayme.wordpress.com/2018/07/01/fake-thinking-that-fake-french-theory-now-complete-with-highly-honored-fascist-spy/

      An example: A vociferous savage from Haiti migrated to Quebec, where he ended writing novellas. That got him to the French Academy (which has only 40 baboons, no more). I saw him the other day vociferous on TV, saying all Africans have to run over Europe, because Europe colonized Africa. This is a demented reasoning, no higher than the worst the Nazis officially held. Indeed, it’s FALSE: I spent my childhood in Africa. There were basically NO Europeans. If one saw 2,000 people, one was lucky to see one white… And that meant generally a Vietnamese or Lebanese…

      “Decolonization” is the worst enemy of Africa, because, as it is presented it inverts the causality (by presenting what is superior, a more advanced civilization, as inferior, and demographic invasion as superior) . Deplutocratization is the friend of Africa.

      Like

  2. Patrice Ayme Says:

    [Sent to Attali]
    The problem of fakery is vast, and involves all of society, even academia, deeply.

    For example Harvard University will start experiments to block sunlight to fight global warming. Sounds seductive, until one realizes that will worsen the CO2 catastrophe. https://patriceayme.wordpress.com/2019/01/11/emotion-plans-logic-want-no-more-fakery-tell-the-truth-hurt-the-feelings-of-fakers/

    Like

  3. Patrice Ayme Says:

    [Sent to APA]

    Actually, people often love to be lied to… as long as it makes them feel good… or less bad.
    One has to realize that facts are epiphenomenons. Emotions and moods are the really deeper structures, and the computations they effect give rise to neural networks themselves (where the ideas are!)
    See: “Emotion plans logic” in author’s website

    Like

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